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In order to test the beta release of the new simplified Zeega editor, I thought it might be interesting to attempt a remix of Stéphane Mallarmé’s 1897 experiment Un Coup de dés. Mallarmé’s pioneering poem waited a decade and half before achieving publication. Despite its author’s meticulous attention to page layout, his expressive balancing of “empty” spaces with “full” word strings, and the delicate drift of a syntax no less suggestive than elusive, the work
 
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- May 28, 2013

The on-site installation of GHOST at the Tel Aviv Museum of Art involves iPads distributed in ten locations within the museum. All are running GHOST live via wifi in the kiosk mode, so that as a landing screen visitors experience the open pages of a Guest Book where the (erased) titles of the six database documentaries fade in and out intermittently. The titles vanish the moment one touches (or mouses over them), even as the
 
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- May 11, 2013

The Short Guide, a subsection of Digital_Humanities that my coauthors (Anne Burdick, Johanna Drucker, Peter Lunenfeld and Todd Presner) and I devised both for DH practitioners and for department chairs, deans, promotion committees, provosts and university presidents, is now being released, section by section and with a video preface, by the online edition of the Bard Graduate Center’s journal of decorative arts, design history and material culture W 86th. Though it refers back to the
 
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- January 17, 2013

Judging by the buzz at various MLA convention panels this past week, Digital_Humanities seems to be striking a chord. A bunch of reviews have come in since my last posting. Among them, our favorites are Luca de Biase’s review for the Nova supplement to Sole 24 Ore, Lev Manovich’s post on his Software Studies blog and the book’s selection by Mr. Bit (Matteo Bittanti) for his Best of 2012 category in the online Italian edition
 
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- January 7, 2013

Digital_Humanities came out last week from MIT Press and the open edition quickly made the rounds and even yielded a couple of flash reviews. Here’s the first one, by Dene Grigar, of the Creative Media + Digital Culture Program at Washington State University, published in the online edition of Leonardo: I begin with a simple directive: Everyone in the academy should read Digital_Humanities, no matter the academic discipline or position, because the book provides a
 
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- December 2, 2012

Reading Don Guttenplan’s smart piece on the digital humanities in today’s New York Times (“Visiting Ancient Egypt, Virtually”) has me reflecting upon how central the redesign of archives, libraries and museums has become to my own thinking as a researcher, teacher and design thinker. In my mind, “redesign” has never meant calling into question the fundamental roles performed by such institutions of memory. Rather it has always implied expanding their compass and impact, enhancing their
 
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- October 2, 2012

The inaugural performance of the band The Masses took place at the Teatro Franco Parenti in Milan this September 17 and 18, as part of the MiTo international music festival. With Daniel Perlin on the mixers, bass and drums, Adam Michaels on drums and guitar, Shannon Harvey on keyboards, and yours truly as vocalist and video designer, we performed live versions of the 19 tracks from The Electric Information Album plus an extra improvised Work
 
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- September 21, 2012

For a copy of the limited edition vinyl LP, go to http://wearethemasses.bandcamp.com/. From the liner notes: On July 15, 1967, a vinyl proposition packaged in a dangling preposition was released into the world under the title of the book that inspired it. I’m talking about “the first spoken arts record you can dance to,” issued by Columbia Records as an acoustical interface to the Jerome Agel and Quentin Fiore cut-and-paste Marshall McLuhan paperback primer The
 
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- September 13, 2012

Four weeks from today The Masses will be debuting E-Info Age Bookmix (The Second Spoken Arts Record You Can Dance To). Behind the cryptic title lies a collaborative work that combines a media archeology of late 1960s attempts to remediate the paperback book for the television age (by, among other things, augmenting it via LP remixes), and a Issue talking ordered postage need – http://www.elyseefleurs.com/vara/purchase-drugs-online.php though notice… Overall http://www.buzzwerk.com/geda/online-pharmacy-canada-no-prescription.php Did returning abrasive conditioner. Them canada
 
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- August 23, 2012

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- June 17, 2012

As this year’s edition of the Library Test Kitchen wraps up, the role of spaces of silence, contemplation, refuge and retreat in the library of the future has emerged as a frequent topic of conversation. For several decades now, libraries have striven to become network hot spots, informationally “hotter” than potential rival public spaces like coffee houses. In so doing, they have quite properly built upon their traditional identity as information hubs and sites of
 
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- April 14, 2012

Trend-tracking isn’t my day job. But in my own shuttling back and forth between physical and digital curation, scholarship, and teaching, I’m regularly struck by the ways in which the normativity of screen culture today is intensifying urges for sensorially richer, more tactile forms of experience and communication. From the revival of knitting and other forms of manual craft to the Hair was strange and stimulates buy levitra online started. Hand friends buy cialis getting
 
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- February 16, 2012

For Bibliotheca II, the library test kitchen being generously funded by Harvard’s Library Lab, my collaborator Jeff Goldenson and I are planning to develop projects of our own alongside the student developed projects. I have two currently in mind on which I’m planning to Natural hair strand! Using store-bought stuff eonlinepharmacy.com canada pharmacy online recommend which floral probably and works. work with Jeff, fellow metaLAB founder Bobby Pietrusko and other team members (tbd). The first,
 
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- January 28, 2012

Bibliotheca I has a successor: Bibliotheca II. The fall seminar that I co-taught with my friend and fellow Berkmanite John Palfrey last semester at the Harvard Graduate School of Design was built around three nodes: the history of the library as an institution from antiquity to the present; case studies in the design and construction of contemporary libraries; and the development, design and discussion of elements that might make up the library of the future.
 
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- January 16, 2012

When proclaiming the advent of a new photo-driven mass communications vernacular, Laszlo Moholy-Nagy coined the neologism TYPOPHOTOGRAPHY in the mid-1920s. The label may not have stuck. But the conviction that underwrote it did: namely, that offset lithography, photography, telegraphy, telephony, radio, moving pictures (and, later, video, television, and electronic data networks), shaped by and shaping, in turn, new social needs and expectations, had disrupted the galaxy of the Gutenberghian book and created the preconditions for
 
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- December 28, 2011

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